Windows 10 Likely To Get Just One Update A Year

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That’s more like it! Microsoft’s current Windows 10 servicing strategy entails two updates every year for the operating system, one in spring and another in fall.

This has been in place since pretty much the start, though the company tweaked this a little by switching to major updates in the first months of the year, and a smaller release towards the end — often considered more of a service pack.

However, there are signs that the firm is now looking to further tweak this.

This evolution of the company’s plans has got to do with a more complex OS approach as it continues to develop new versions and flavors of its operating platform like the upcoming Windows 10X and the newly hinted Cloud PC.

According to this solid little report, Microsoft is switching to a single update per year for Windows 10.

Redmond also wants to release major updates for Windows 10X every 12 months, and the only way to see this strategy through is by shifting to a yearly release cadence for both the operating systems, albeit with a twist.

Basically, the spring feature update would only be shipped for Windows 10X, while devices running Windows 10 would get a pack of improvements in the fall. The rest of the updates like quality updates, also known as cumulative updates, will continue to arrive just like they do now.

This new approach gets underway in 2021, according to the information provided.

And if it does, the first and only update Windows 10 will get next year will go live in fall. The 20H1 release that was supposed to see daylight in spring may not happen at all, with the official launch of Windows 10X taking its place.

We’ll just have to wait and see, but all signs were pointing to something like this.

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